Effective Ways to Boost Your Melatonin, Naturally

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Effective Ways to Boost Your Melatonin, Naturally

#4 Eating Natural Foods High in Melatonin

Including foods such as bananas, cherries, oats, sweet corn, walnuts, almonds, pineapple, bananas and oranges, and Goji berries in your daily food intake is an excellent way to boost your melatonin levels naturally. Also, including foods which comprise of tryptophan which supports the production of serotonin and melatonin. Foods high in tryptophan are sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and ginger. For example, a mixture of sunflower seeds, walnuts, and almonds is perfect for a vibrant, bedtime snack for better sleep.  


#3 Limiting Artificial, LED, and Ambient Light at Bedtime

The production of melatonin is blocked by ambient and artificial light.   Smartphones, computer screens, and televisions generate a significant amount of blue light.  In fact, these devices produce 30% more blue light than the sun which blocks melatonin secretion.  Excessive use of electronic devices close to bedtime will compromise manufacturing of melatonin.

#2 Get Some Sunlight

To optimize melatonin production requires one to two hours of sunlight exposure.  This will vary by factors such as location, gender, age, and genetics. For example, females have been shown to exhibit higher levels of blood levels of melatonin; however, the exact mechanisms are unknown.  Awareness of symptoms as tiredness during the day, irritability, and nighttime insomnia can help people better gauge whether or not they are experiencing melatonin deficiency.

#1 Reducing Daily Caffeine Consumption

Consuming too much caffeine throughout the day can delay melatonin secretion at night.  Reducing caffeine consumption in the morning and throughout the day is an effective way to lessen melatonin imbalances which is a growing problem among adults and children. Melatonin secretion is regulated by key transmitters such as adenosine, that can be blocked by caffeine intake.

Approximately 9:00PM, the hormone melatonin is secreted by the pineal gland, which is located in the brain. It helps to regulate sleep, internal body clock, and reproductive cycles. When melatonin production and release are imbalanced, people may have problems meeting their individual sleep requirements. Getting more sunlight exposure, eating foods high in melatonin and tryptophan, smelling lavender and limiting artificial lights at bedtime are useful naturally evidence-based ways to increase melatonin and experience better sleep and work performance the next day.


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Military Times Spring Reading List: The Morning Mind

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Military Times Spring Reading List: The Morning Mind

Military Times Spring Reading List: “The Morning Mind: Use Your Brain to Master Your Day and Supercharge Your Life” by Dr. Rob Carter III and Dr. Kirti Salwe Carter, HarperCollins, 224 pages

Waking up is no longer hard to do.

Rob is an Army lieutenant colonel, and probably his morning reveilles one to emulate or to think about while you have a mocha latte instead. (Catherine Leonardo’s cover cleverly shows a cup of coffee’s steam forming an outline of a brain.)

Blending medicine, science and a wholistic sensibility, Rob (Ph.D.) and Kirti, his wife (M.D.), rise to the occasion. “Our objective is to master the morning and the rest of the day efficiently.”

In the morning, your body is taller and your brain is bigger after a night’s sleep, they say. To help you stay fresh, they offer tips that begin “the very second you wake.” First, drink a glass of water — because your body is dehydrated after hours of sleep. And because the book’s scientific style, though practical, can be dry.

Read More: https://www.militarytimes.com/off-duty/military-culture/2019/03/24/spring-reading-list-top-nonfiction-about-women-in-combat-racism-and-rules-of-war-plus-outstanding-literary-fiction-from-veterans/

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Human Brain: Unanswered Questions

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Human Brain: Unanswered Questions

Recent technological advances in functional magnetic resonance imaging and optogenetics have made the brain accessible in ways that previous generations of neuroscientists could only dream of. Here are three unsolved mysteries (Mind you or "Brain you; There are many many more)!

  1. How do we perceive pain? Have you ever withdrawn your hand after touching a hot stovetop or something by accident? of course NOT, you would never do such a thing! Maybe you "know a friend" that did. Your friend's pain sensations started with the activation of pain receptors – or nociceptors – in their hand. The information is conducted to the spinal cord, before entering higher brain areas for the perception of pain. However, a perception of pain is a subjective experience, and some people experience pain more or less severely than others. However, since you never experienced this, it is very subjective! Why? The gate control theory of pain suggests that pain signals that enter the spinal cord can be modified – amplified, diminished or completely blocked – before they enter the brain. Supporting this theory are the many accounts of how people injured on battlefields or while playing sports do not experience pain until much later. Amazing!

  2. Next unsolved mystery! Why do we sleep and dream? While you may not have experienced pain, for sure you a candidate for sleep. We spend about a third of our lives sleeping, or we should spend about a third of our lives sleeping. Why should we invest so much time in sleep? The most straightforward answer is that sleep is restorative, and that it replenishes the body’s energy stores. However, intense neural activity during rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, the stage in which most dreams occur, suggests there may be more to the story. It is probably why infants and toddlers need up to 14 hours of sleep a day, with half of it spent in REM sleep. In adults, dreams may also play a role in brain plasticity and learning, which is why sleep-deprived adults perform worse in memory tests and tasks. Nevertheless, the actual role of sleep and dreams remain a big mystery.

  3. Finally, How do we make decisions? Each day we are faced with hundreds of decisions which can range from trivial to life-changing. Recent data suggests that decisions are the outcome of two separate brain systems: cognitive control and the valuation network. While the valuation network supplies the brain with information about the value of each choice, it is cognitive control which keeps the overall goal in focus, preventing the brain from being overwhelmed with information.

  4. Pain, sleep, dreams, and decision-making remains, in part, mysteries for mankind.

  5. As Winston Churchill stated, “Criticism may not be agreeable, but it is necessary. It fulfills the same function as pain in the human body; it calls attention to the development of an unhealthy state of things".

  6. Finally, if someone criticizes your decision-making, get your 8 hours of sleep. More than likely, the pain will be less in the AM. The Brain is amazing!

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Stress Management 101: People can learn to manage stress and lead happier healthier lives.

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Stress Management 101: People can learn to manage stress and lead happier healthier lives.

Learning how to manage your levels of stress is a key component of mood mastery and also long-term wellbeing. Our bodies are running outdated biological-programming which isn’t equipped to cope with the day to day events and overstimulation of modern life.

We need to reprogram the mind to stay calm and actively manage our own physiology with various stress reduction techniques:

  • Keep a positive attitude.

  • Accept that there are events that you cannot control.

  • Keep a positive attitude.

  • Exercise regularly

  • Learn and practice relaxation techniques; try meditation, yoga, or tai-chi for stress management.

  • Eat healthy, well-balanced meals.

  • or just BREATH..The simplest method for stress management is to regulate your breathe! The speed and depth of your breath create a feedback loop informing the body what is going on. If you are rapidly panting it sends the signal ‘something is wrong!’ if you take calm deep breaths it sends the signal ‘all is well’. Choosing to breathe more fully and slowly (e.g. when in a stressful situation like an argument) will prevent the cascade of stress signals. Regular deep breathing (for 5 minutes a day) reduces stress levels significantly.

  • Are you Breathing Properly? Proper Breathing is the Key to Healthy Living

Learn more at https://www.themorningmind.com/media

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